Cooper Lewis Condominium | Logan Circle

Located at 1413 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20005

What is both old and new, historic and contemporary, and located on of the most popular blocks in Washington, DC? The answer is the Cooper Lewis condominium building with its spacious, ultra-luxurious urban city residences. Just how luxurious? Condos for sale have been listing between $800,000 and $2 million—on the rare occasion that they actually hit the market.

Luxury condos Cooper Lewis in Washington DC for sale

Cooper Lewis Condos for Sale | 1413 P St, Washington

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Let’s first cover the old part of the story. Way back in 1897, a prominent pharmacist named Dr. Samuel Lewis commissioned the design of a new building by noted architect Paul Pelz (also responsible for the Library of Congress). Located at the corner of 14th and P Streets, it would become commonly known as the Pelz Building. In 1925, Lewis leased the structure to Edward and Jennie Cooper who would run their popular Cooper Hardware store for the next 50 years.

Condos for sale at Cooper Lewis in Washington DC

Nearly three more decades would pass before the next chapter of the story would begin. Developer Scott Pannick of Metropolis teamed with RTKL Architects to transform the aging structure into something very new. Components of the building’s core, including brick interior walls, were kept in place. But a new and very contemporary six-story component would be built around those original elements. Named for the building’s original principals, Cooper Lewis is located 1413 P Street, NW in fashionable Logan Circle. The original address of the Pelz Building was around the corner on 14th Street.

From the outside, the condominium is all glass and hard right angles with pronounced front bays. But step inside and you’ll find that the units themselves combine the flavor of old and original exposed brick walls with new modernist themes, not the least of which are genuine floor-to-ceiling window walls. The “great room” concept is common to the 14 different floor plans—a rather astonishing number considering there are only 20 of these urban city homes in total. You'll also find gleaming hardwood floors, open kitchens with stainless steel appliances and granite counters, and private outdoor spaces for all units.

Residents enjoy private parking, extra secure storage and a package service agreement with the popular next-door Lofts 14

The Logan Circle Experience

Logan Circle is a neighborhood rich in history yet always evolving. When it comes to residential living, you’ll find everything from grand old structures to new cutting edge designs. In the case of Cooper Lewis—as noted above—it’s a combination of both.

The neighborhood dates back to the original planning of the District under Pierre L’Enfant. Under the architect’s master plan, various circles that were placed throughout the city were thought of as gathering places, much in the same manner as square or rectangular parks. This was long before the invention of the automobile. Regardless, grand avenues such as those that converge on Logan Circle—Rhode Island and Vermont—did date back to the earliest days, even if homes and apartment buildings were still decades in the offing.

During the Civil War, the neighborhood was still rural land and was home to Camp Barker, a barracks that becamse a camp for freed slaves. The circle was originally named Iowa Circle in honor of General Grenville Dodge of Iowa who had led a volunteer regiment during the war and was also a congressman representing his state in the House of Representatives. But the honor could only be given post-humorously and it Dodge was still very much alive. And so, the circle was ultimately renamed for John A. Logan, a Union General and representative from the state of Illinois. A statue of Logan astride his horse was placed in the circle and dedicated in 1901.

Residential development began in earnest after the war, with Federal-style row houses cropping up as early as the late 1860s, followed by Second Empire, Beaux Arts, Richardsonian Romanesque and Gothic designs. The late 1800s and early 1900s also saw a large number of apartment buildings that would ultimately convert to condos and cooperatives for sale many decades later.

Flash forward a century and you’ll find that the Logan Circle of today is a vibrant residential neighborhood with a well-rounded mixture of then and now. From historic row houses to grand old apartment buildings that have gone condo or cooperative, and contemporary condos of all types, this is a great place to home-hunt. Also of note is the collection of former auto body and car showrooms along Church Street, once known as Auto Row, that have been converted into super hip lofts and flats with industrial finishes.

Logan Circle is easy walking distance to Downtown DC and the White House, and is next-door to Dupont Circle. There’s a Whole Foods, a ton of great restaurants, indie shops, gyms, a farmers market and the amazing Studio Theatre with progressive plays and events. You can even hang out in the inner green of the traffic circle itself—a cool place to sip coffee, walk the dog, people watch, play bocce ball or simply relax. To learn more about condos for sale at Cooper Lewis please call Andre Perez at District Partners at Compass, 202-798-3600.

Luxury Condo & Coop Collection

 

Metropolitan Regional Information System LogoThe listing content relating to real estate for sale on this web site is courtesy of MRIS. Listing information comes from various brokers who participate in the MRIS IDX.Properties listed with brokerage firms other than COMPASS are marked with the MRIS Logo and detailed information about them includes the name of the listing brokers.The properties displayed may not be all the properties available. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.All listing information copyright MRIS 2019.

Listing information last updated on September 22nd, 2019 at 5:45am EDT.

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