Truro Homes for Sale in Fairfax, VA

Located in the Annandale area in Fairfax County, Virginia, Truro is an example of the late stages of mid-century modernism. Designed by prominent architects Robert Campbell Deigert and David Norton Yerkes, the suburban subdivision is home to 377 single-family homes, built in three phases.

The heavily wooded land where the residential suburb was developed has long historical roots, dating to Truro Parish, founded by the Virginia General Assembly in 1732. Flash forward to 1967 when developers began clearing trees for the new Fairfax County project. By 1969, a sizable number of homes had been delivered. The neighborhood was completed by the early 1970s.

Mid-Century Modern Homes for Sale in Truro

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Mid-Century Home Styles in Truro

There are a lot of choices when it comes to home styles in Truro. In Phase 1, five contemporary models were introduced in both single and two-story floor plans. Phase 2 brought another six contemporary models. During Phase 3, five models in more traditional Colonial architecture were added.

The smallest house was the Rothingham, a single-level Rambler with three bedrooms, two baths and a full basement. However, the majority of residences had from two to four levels, with up to five bedrooms. Square footage ranged up to 3,670 in the first phase. While many of the contemporary models had either Rambler or Split-Level forms, there were some notable exceptions. Such was the case when noted architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen contributed the Skyview—an unusual design nicknamed the “pod house” with multiple mansard roofs with stems. Only five of these homes were produced.

There’s lots in the way of community amenities, with the Truro swimming pool, clubhouse, tennis and basketball courts, picnic areas and lovely walking trails. The Truro swim, dive and tennis teams compete with others in Northern Virginia leagues. The Social Committee is also quite active, planning all sorts of events like a winter social, Halloween parade, summer pool parties and other fun activities.

Homes for sale in Truro offer an interesting time capsule of an era in which the tail end of mid-century modernism dovetailed into styles that are more common in the Washington Metro area. The suburb is just south of the Little River Turnpike in the Annandale area, and about a mile west of the Beltway.

Mid-Century Neighborhoods in Fairfax County

In addition to Truro, there are several other sizable mid-century neighborhoods in Fairfax County. The largest and perhaps best-known is Hollin Hills in the southern part of Alexandria. Here you’ll find 450 single-family homes, the vast majority of which were designed by noted modernist Charles M. Goodman. While developed over a lengthy timeline, from 1949 to 1970, the architecture is emblematic of early mid-century modernism with sharp angles, flat or butterfly roofs and massive window walls.

The waterfront community of Wessynton in the Mount Vernon area was designed by the same team responsible for Truro: Deigert & Yerkes. Like Truro, this subdivision with 156 single-family homes, is an example of the last gasps of mid-century contemporary style. Built between 1967 and 1972, the houses have redwood ceilings and come in five models, Garden, Forest, Manor, Meadow and River. There are 37 of the waterfront River homes, boasting 3,540 square feet of space and giant decks overlooking Little Hunting Creek.

Holmes Run Acres in Falls Church offers 355 homes built from 1951 to around 1961. The chief architects were Nicholas Satterlee and Francis Donald Lethbridge. Models range from a modest cubist single-story Rambler with 864 square feet to the “Manor” with around 2,400 square feet. There were three construction companies involved in three phases of development, with the largest number built by the Luria Brothers between 1951 and 1953. The homes had extra-wide doors, massive chimneys and post and beam ceilings.

Hickory Cluster is a neighborhood in Reston with 90 townhouses designed by Charles Goodman. The buildings have grid-like patterns of windows, cement beams and brick panels, and overlook both Lake Anne and Reston Town Center. The townhouses are arranged in clusters around common areas and walking paths, and are a fascinating insight into the “new town” principles of the era.

The community of Pine Springs is in the Falls Church area and was developed over a period of more than 10 years, beginning around 1951. There are 121 homes here, designed by such notable modernist architects as Chloethiel Woodard Smith, Arthur Keyes, Nicholas Satterlee and Donald Lethbridge. These are some of the most progressive mid-century homes for sale in Washington Metro, with elements of cubism and dominant window walls.

And while a number of homes for sale in Lake Barcroft have evolved over time, including new custom construction and additions, the roots of the community are in the mid-century era. You’ll find some fascinating designs throughout this lakefront neighborhood, including stacked cubes with jutting decks overlooking the water and a custom two-story home with vaulted ceilings, dramatic roof shapes, leggo-kit angles, 4,675 square feet of living space and a swimming pool with waterfall overlooking the lake.

To learn more about homes for sale in Truro, or other mid-century modern neighborhoods throughout the Washington Metro area, call Andre Perez at District Partners at Compass (202) 798-3600.

Metropolitan Regional Information System LogoThe listing content relating to real estate for sale on this web site is courtesy of MRIS. Listing information comes from various brokers who participate in the MRIS IDX.Properties listed with brokerage firms other than COMPASS are marked with the MRIS Logo and detailed information about them includes the name of the listing brokers.The properties displayed may not be all the properties available. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified.All listing information copyright MRIS 2019.

Listing information last updated on August 23rd, 2019 at 3:45pm EDT.

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